About the work For    most    of    his    adult    life    Andrew    Payne    has    been fascinated    by    the    natural    world.    He    has    a    particular interest   in   the   appearance   of   water,   light   and   clouds   in landscape.      For      many      years      he      made      colour photographs   of   the   landscape   within   walking   distance   of his    house.    This    landscape    is    not    exotic    -    it    is    the riverside   in   the   centre   of   the   English   town   where   he lives.   He   now      makes   short   films   of   this   place,   which adds   time   to   the   structure   of   the   work.   The   films   show the    effect    of    light    in    some    way    -    for    example,    its interaction   with   water,   or   the   projection   of   shadows   into his   home   by   sunlight.   The   work   captures   the   changes   in the   light   and   colour   in   these   places   over   time,   in   order   to reveal it to the viewer. Words    by    the    British    painter    Paul    Nash    seem    very relevant    to    his    work.    Nash    wrote    about    the    ‘unseen landscapes’    of    England    in    a    Country    Life    magazine article   in   1938:   The   landscapes   I   have   in   mind   are   not part   of   the   unseen   world   in   the   psychic   sense,   nor   are they   part   of   the   Unconscious.   They   belong   to   the   world that    lies,    visibly,    about    us.    They    are    unseen    merely because   they   are   not   perceived;   only   in   that   way   can they be regarded as invisible. The    two    images    on    this    page    highlight    his    continual interest   in   the   effects   of   light   on   water   in   landscape. They   show   the   dual   nature   of   water   to   be   both   reflective and transparent at the same time. His   films   are   non-narrative   in   form. The   camera   is   fixed   on   a   tripod   and   its   zoom   lens   is   used   to   frame   the   shot. The   camera   and   lens remain motionless while the shot is recorded. The only movement that occurs is within the frame of the shot. His   interest   in   using   a   static   camera   to   make   films   from   a   single   shot   led   to   his   discovery   of   the   work   of   Justin   Remes,   a   professor   of film   studies   at   Iowa   State   University.   In   his   book   “Motion(less)   Pictures:   The   Cinema   of   Stasis”   Remes   writes   about   films   that   are static   and   do   not   move,   and   argues   that   all   films   unfold   in   time,   suggesting   that   duration   is   more   fundamental   to   cinema   than   motion. In   Andrew’s   films   it   is   the   effect   of   changes   in   light   over   the   duration   of   time   that   is   one   of   the   most   important   features   of   his   work. The   films   are   all   between   1   and   5   minutes   in   duration   and   consist   of   single   shots,   sequences   of   images,   or   combinations   of   two moving images on a single screen.
Water under the bridge, no. 31 (Photograph - 1994)
Weir light 6 (Film still - 2016)
About the work For   most   of   his   adult   life   Andrew   Payne   has   been   fascinated   by   the   natural   world. He    has    a    particular    interest    in    the    appearance    of    water,    light    and    clouds    in landscape.   For   many   years   he   made   colour   photographs   of   the   landscape   within walking   distance   of   his   house. This   landscape   is   not   exotic   -   it   is   the   riverside   in   the centre   of   the   English   town   where   he   lives.   He   now      makes   short   films   of   this   place, which   adds   time   to   the   structure   of   the   work.   The   films   show   the   effect   of   light   in some   way   -   for   example,   its   interaction   with   water,   or   the   projection   of   shadows   into his   home   by   sunlight.   The   work   captures   the   changes   in   the   light   and   colour   in these places over time, in order to reveal it to the viewer. Words   by   the   British   painter   Paul   Nash   seem   very   relevant   to   his   work.   Nash   wrote about   the   ‘unseen   landscapes’   of   England   in   a   Country   Life   magazine   article   in 1938:   The   landscapes   I   have   in   mind are   not   part   of   the   unseen   world   in   the psychic   sense,   nor   are   they   part   of   the Unconscious.   They   belong   to   the   world that    lies,    visibly,    about    us.    They    are unseen    merely    because    they    are    not perceived;   only   in   that   way   can   they   be regarded as invisible. The   two   images   on   this   page   highlight his    continual    interest    in    the    effects    of light   on   water   in   landscape.   They   show the    dual    nature    of    water    to    be    both reflective    and    transparent    at    the    same time. His   films   are   non-narrative   in   form.   The   camera   is   fixed   on   a   tripod   and   its   zoom lens   is   used   to   frame   the   shot.   The   camera   and   lens   remain   motionless   while   the shot is recorded. The only movement that occurs is within the frame of the shot. His   interest   in   using   a   static   camera   to   make   films   from   a   single   shot   led   to   his discovery   of   the   work   of   Justin   Remes,   a   professor   of   film   studies   at   Iowa   State University.   In   his   book   “Motion(less)   Pictures:   The   Cinema   of   Stasis”   Remes   writes about   films   that   are   static   and   do   not   move,   and   argues   that   all   films   unfold   in   time, suggesting   that   duration   is   more   fundamental   to   cinema   than   motion.   In   Andrew’s films   it   is   the   effect   of   changes   in   light   over   the   duration   of   time   that   is   one   of   the most   important   features   of   his   work.   The   films   are   all   between   1   and   5   minutes   in duration   and   consist   of   single   shots,   sequences   of   images,   or   combinations   of   two moving images on a single screen.
Water under the bridge, no. 31 (Photograph - 1994)
Weir light 6 (Film still - 2016)
Andrew Payne